Ethical Consumerism

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Ethical Consumerism

Stock Photo credits to Ishoopuertorico

Stock Photo credits to Ishoopuertorico

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Stock Photo credits to Ishoopuertorico

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Stock Photo credits to Ishoopuertorico

Renee Chaples, Chief and Editor

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Recently, many online shops such as Romwe and Wish have increased in popularity. The sites are known for their alarmingly cheap products that range from kitchenware to gaming consoles. However, it seems that most of the users of the site do not question as to why the products are so cheap.

Under Wish’s terms and conditions, they explicitly state, “Neither Wish nor its licensors or suppliers makes any representations or warranties concerning any content contained in or accessed through the Services…,” So, unsurprisingly, Wish does not manufacture their own goods, they just act as a third-party seller. Although their website does not state it, it is common knowledge that their products come from China.

Many articles such as  one from the Atlantic state, “I ordered the watch from Wish.com, one of a growing number of sites that allows consumers from around the world to buy deeply discounted goods from China, directly from sellers or manufacturers there.” China is known as the world’s largest manufacturer. However, these workers are forced into a horrible working climate with little pay.

In 2018, the working conditions in China are known to be so bad, that when someone types, “Poor Working..”, the first google suggested article is about China. Specifically, the article from Voa news states, “China Labor Watch says the employees often work in dangerous conditions and are not well-trained.”

Of course, the general population disagrees with this treatment. However, the only way to abolish it is to protest by not purchasing the products or lend a metaphorical hand in China, but with Chinese politics getting more gruesome, it is probably ideal to stay away from any further involvement. So there is only one technique left- protesting. However, to stop purchasing products would include more than just the products sold on wish. Name brands are being exposed to have taken part in this tragic degradation, as well. So here lays the questions, Is it Possible in 2018, to be a consumer of products, yet maintain morals?

Exposure of workers is just one branch of all that is wrong in the manufacturing world. There is also the issue of supporting products that test on animals, and products created by people with differing beliefs. It’s very hard to identify a brand that not only uphold to the consumer’s expectations, but to find a brand that is constant with those expectations, aka sell outs.   

Renee Chaples, Editor-n-Chief

Hello! My name is Renee Chaples. I am the Editor-n-Chief for the fall semester since Aislinn will not be able to return to Paw Print until January. Alongside...

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