Animal Crossing

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Animal Crossing

Title Art for

Title Art for "Animal Crossing: New Leaf"

Credit to Goomba Stomp

Title Art for "Animal Crossing: New Leaf"

Credit to Goomba Stomp

Credit to Goomba Stomp

Title Art for "Animal Crossing: New Leaf"

Renee Chaples, Producer of the Void

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Most Nintendo fans associate the company with the creation of “Super Mario Bros,” “Legend Of Zelda,” and their earlier gaming consoles that came to shape the course of video games. A true underdog of Nintendo games however, is their light-hearted RPG game known to this day as “Animal Crossing.”

When it was first released in Japan back in 2001, “Animal Crossing” was titled “Animal Forrest” and it would remain that way until its American release back in 2003. In order for the game to make sense to English speaking players, they translated the game and added in American holidays, thus creating the more familiar “Animal Crossing” game. Due to the immense success from the two games in Japan and the U.S., Nintendo would expand the franchise all the way to their most recent release in 2017 of “Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp”, which is a mobile game. One of the game’s most revolutionary aspects is its time sequence. In every make of the game, the dates and times follow that of real life. For example, if it is 7:00 am on Saturday, June 15, 2006 the date will be the same for the characters. Due to this mechanic, players need to check on their towns regularly since they can easily miss out on special opportunities.

The premise of the game, which is to pay off a mortgage by doing chores around the town, may not seem special, but it gives players an escape into a calming, serene world. In addition to some easy-going gameplay, all of the NCPs (non playable characters) are animals instead of the traditional choice of humans. In earlier versions, the main character (the player) would typically be riding a train on their way to their new town. The player will answer a series of questions with another train-rider that will determine their age, looks, name, and the town’s name. Once the chat is over, the player will arrive at their new town late at night where they will meet the town’s beloved mayor Tortimer. From this point on the player is free to roam their new town, decide where they want their house to be built, and meet the other residents.

Every game usually has the same set of hobbies the player can pick up to contain the in-game currency, known as “bells.” These hobbies include sea fishing, river fishing, gardening, harvesting crops, digging for artifacts, running errands for the other townies, and selling old furniture or clothing. There is no leveling system so a player can choose to do one or all of the available hobbies. Alongside making money, players can interact with every character in the game which features a wide range of different dialogue options. In addition to that, the characters have the ability to interact with each other, send mail, and sometimes move out of the town. Fortunately characters that do move away visit fairly often.

The animal crossing franchise may not be for everyone, however, it does pose as a good stress reliever for anyone who may be overwhelmed by the real world. The most recent release, mentioned earlier, “Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp” allows players to go mobile. Available for both IOS and Android, the game features all the iconic characters from the first makes and even newer characters. Instead of a little town the player is placed in a campsite that they manage and can invite any of their favorite characters. The loading time for this release however was a major setback and turned the noses of many loyal “Animal Crossing” players. Regardless, it is a perfect game to procrastinate math homework with.